SEMCA provides a wealth of different programs operating in the Southeast Michigan area. Below is a list of SEMCA’s primary programs and services. Click the toggles to open a description.

SEMCA works with our local Adult Education providers to help provide the necessary educational skills needed to begin a new career or advance in a a current one. Each American job center works with partners in their area.

Adult Education provides an opportunity for adults to improve or achieve education levels equivalent to those of high-school graduates each year.  Instruction is tailored to meet the individual needs of adult students. Standardized tests identify existing skill levels, appropriate instruction, and academic gains due to instruction.

Description of Services

Over 100 programs statewide provide a range of free or low cost services, such as:

Adult Basic Education (ABE) – Help adults improve their reading, writing and mathematics skills for people below the ninth grade level.

Adult Secondary Education (ASE) – Help learners achieve the education needed to obtain a high school equivalency credential and transition to college, training and/or employment.

ASE options include:

Remediation – You have your high school diploma but need to improve your reading, writing or math skills.

High School Equivalency (HSE) – Instruction that prepares you to take and pass a high school equivalency test such as the GED®. Get more information about the GED test and GED to School program. (*Warning Regarding Misleading GED® Claims – The State of Michigan GED® diploma cannot be obtained through the internet. Passing the GED® tests usually requires extensive preparation. Tests are administered only at Pearson Vue® Testing Centers under the direction of Person Vue® and the GED Testing Service.)

High School Completion (HSC) – Only need a few credits to earn your high school diploma? HSC allows you to earn high school credit and obtain an adult education high school diploma.

English Language Acquisition (ELA) – Help non-native speakers improve their English skills to be able to further their education, help their children with schoolwork and activities, obtain training and employment.

Integrated ELA and Civics Education (IELCE) – Assists non-native speakers to improve their English skills while learning how to become an effective parent, citizen, and worker.

Literacy Councils – Provide one-on-one tutoring for a range of academic levels, but usually for adults who have very low-level reading and math skills.

 

Are you interested in CNC, CAD, Robotics, Automation or Advanced Manufacturing?

What is the America’s Promise CATALYST?

America’s Promise Catalyst is a project funded by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Division managed by the Workforce Intelligence Network for Southeast Michigan (WIN) and its partners. Advance Michigan Catalyst aims to train unemployed and underemployed residents of Southeast Michigan to prepare them for careers in robotics and automation. The grant’s training industry focus include robotics technicians and engineers, CAD, CNC/CCMTO technicians, mechatronics, photonics, industrial maintenance, electro-mechanical, industrial and mechanical engineering technicians, commercial/industrial designers and robotic welders/soldering. For more information visit a Michigan Works! American Job Center near you:

Eligibility:

To receive training services funded through the DOL America’s Promise grant, the individual must:

  • Be a citizen of the United States or an eligible non-citizen
  • Be 16 years of age or older
  • Not currently enrolled in a school within a local educational agency and
  • Be registered with selective service (if applicable)

The participant must be unemployed, underemployed, or an incumbent worker.

  • Unemployed worker: an individual who is without a job and who is seeking employment and is available to work.
  • Underemployed worker: This term refers to individuals who are not currently connected to a full-time job commensurate with the individual’s level of education, skills, or wage and/or salary earned previously, or who have obtained only episodic, short-term, or part-time employment.
  • Incumbent workers: This term refers to individuals who are employed, particularly in lower-skill, lower-wage, and front-line jobs, but need training to upgrade their skills to secure full-time employment, advance in their careers, or retain their current occupations in an H-1B occupations and industries. The training provided to incumbent workers is developed with an employer or employer association.

 

WORKFORCE INNOVATION AND OPPORTUNITY ACT (WIOA)
DISLOCATED WORKER PROGRAM

SEMCA Michigan Works! American Job Centers operate Dislocated Worker programs on a year-round basis. The funds allocated to the MWAs for the dislocated worker program must be used to provide career (basic and individualized) services and training services.

Basic Career Services: Program information and basic assessment, general information, individual job development, advanced job club, advanced screened referrals, group activities, job search.

Individualized Career Services: Comprehensive specialized assessment, individual employment planning, counseling, short-term pre-vocational skills, case management, literacy activity, out of area job search, relocation assistance, internship and work experience.

Training Services: Occupational skills training, On-the-Job training (OJT), workplace training with related instruction, registered apprenticeship (which incorporates both OJT and classroom training), incumbent worker training, pre-apprenticeship training, skill upgrading and retraining, entrepreneurial training, transitional jobs, adult education and literacy training provided in combination with any other training services.

To be eligible for participation in the WIOA Title I Dislocated Worker program, that is, to receive career services, and to meet the eligibility requirements for training services, an individual must be 18 years of age or older, a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen and registered with Selective Service (if applicable) to receive services under the dislocated worker program. Participant eligibility is also dependent upon also dependent upon:

  • Has been terminated or laid off, or who has received a notice of termination or layoff, and
  • Is eligible for or has exhausted entitlement to unemployment compensation; or
  • Has been employed for a duration sufficient to demonstrate attachment to the workforce, but is not eligible for unemployment compensation; and
  • Is unlikely to return to a previous industry or occupation; or
  • Has been terminated or laid off, or has received a notice of termination or layoff, from employment as a result of any permanent closure of, or any substantial layoff at, a plant, facility, or enterprise; or
  • Is employed at a facility at which the employer has made a general announcement that such facility will close within 180 days; or
  • Is employed at a facility at which the employer has made a general announcement that such facility will close; or
  • Was self-employed but is unemployed as a result of general economic conditions; or
  • Is a displaced homemaker.

The Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 provides that state agencies be given maximum flexibility in designing Employment & Training (E&T) programs for individuals receiving food assistance.
The State of Michigan operates a voluntary FAE&T program, which is jointly administered by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) and the WDA.

Even though the E&T program is voluntary, there is an individual work requirement, and Food Assistance Program (FAP) benefits are time-limited for able-bodied adults without dependents (ABAWDs.) An ABAWD is between the ages of 18 and 49 years old (beginning the first calendar
month after the 18th birthday through the last calendar month before the
50th birthday). Also, the ABAWD will not have a minor (under the age of 18) on their FAP case.

Time Limited Food Assistance (TLFA) allows a non-deferred ABAWD to receive FAP benefits for three months in a 36-month period without meeting the work requirement. The three months are referred to as “countable months.” An individual who has received three countable months can regain FAP eligibility (within the 36-month period) by complying with the work requirement or meeting a deferral criterion. The first 36-month period began January 1, 2017, and ends December 31, 2019. The MDHHS is responsible for determining if an individual receives a countable month and has the authority to grant good cause and remove
a countable month.

SEMCA and the Michigan Department of Corrections via a contract with Health Management Systems of America (HMSA) operate a program through our Wayne and Highland Park offices to secure job preparation, soft skills and employment for returning citizens. Customers are referred by their Parole Officers and our staff works with felon friendly employers to help participants get a new start on a new life.

PATH: Partnership. Accountability. Training. Hope.

Many families seeking cash assistance through the Michigan Family Independence Program (FIP) face significant barriers in securing and retaining employment. From child care to transportation and literacy, caseworkers cite a long list of barriers that can keep families from achieving self-sufficiency.
Applicants for cash assistance will take part in a robust, results-oriented work participation program – PATH. The program features a 21-day assessment period during which barriers to employment are identified and caseworkers work individually with clients to connect them with resources to address these barriers. This intensive orientation period is a departure from the previous program, JET (Jobs, Education and Training), in which orientation periods varied across the state from one to three days. The orientation and job placement program under PATH will continue to be administered by the Workforce Development Agency and Michigan Works! Agencies, which hold the contracts for these activities statewide.

The Rising Tide project supports vibrant, thriving communities to attract business investment and talent by creating a sustainable path toward economic stability and growth. The Michigan Economic Development Corporation, Talent Investment Agency, and Michigan State Housing Development Authority–collectively, the Talent and Economic Development (TED) team–have committed their assets to engaging specific communities across the state in order to empower them to shape their future and maximize economic potential. In each “round” of the Rising Tide program, one community in each of the ten Michigan Prosperity Regions was selected using data about poverty, unemployment, renter occupancy, and vacancies, cross-matched by population. In Round 1 River Rouge was the community selected in the SEMCA region. In round 2 Hamtramck was selected.

The TAA program is a federal program that assists U.S. workers who have lost or may lose their jobs as a result of foreign trade. This program seeks to provide adversely affected workers with opportunities to obtain the skills, credentials, resources, and support necessary to become reemployed. TAA includes a variety of benefits and reemployment services to help unemployed workers prepare for and obtain suitable employment. Workers may be eligible for training, a job search allowance, a relocation allowance, and other reemployment readjustment services.

Additionally, weekly trade readjustment allowances (TRA) may be payable to eligible workers following their exhaustion of unemployment benefits. Usually, TRA benefits will be paid only if an individual is enrolled in an approved training program.

Petition Process

The first step to receiving TAA benefits and services is to file a petition on-line or by mail with the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL). The petition may be filed by:

  • Three or more workers in the same firm or subdivision
  • The workers’ employer
  • A union official or other duly authorized representative of such workers
  • A State of Michigan Workforce Development Agency or Michigan Works! Agency representative

Upon receiving a petition, USDOL initiates an investigation to determine whether the circumstances of the layoff meet the group eligibility criteria established by the program.

TAA Program Eligibility

A petition identifies a worker group at a specific firm or subdivision and covers all individuals in that group.  Generally, if a worker is laid off, a petition must be submitted within one year of the layoff for that worker to be covered by the petition and the certification, if USDOL grants the petition.  A group of workers may be eligible for TAA if their jobs are lost or threatened due to trade-related circumstances as determined by the USDOL investigation.

After the investigation, the USDOL determines group eligibility to apply for TAA benefits and services.

Workers in a certified group will be notified by their local Michigan Works! Agency, at which time they may apply for individual eligibility for benefits and services.

If a worker is a member of a worker group certified by the USDOL, that worker may receive benefits: For more information visit your local American Job Center.

Resources

SEMCA Michigan Works! American Job Centers operate adult programs on a year-round basis. The funds allocated to the MWAs for the adult program must be used to support core, intensive, and training services.

Basic Career Services: Basic career services are available to all dislocated workers and may include: Program information and basic assessment, general information, individual job development, advanced job club, advanced screened referrals, group activities, job search.

Individualized Career Services: Individualized career services are designed for dislocated workers who have been unable to obtain employment through core services and have been determined to be in need of more individualized services. Individualized career services may include: Comprehensive specialized assessment, individual employment planning, counseling, short-term pre-vocational skills, case management, literacy activity, out of area job search, relocation assistance, internship and work experience.

Training Services: Occupational skills training, On-the-Job training, workplace training with related instruction, registered apprenticeship, incumbent worker training, pre-apprenticeship training, skill upgrading and retraining, entrepreneurial training, transitional jobs, adult education and literacy training provided in combination with any other training services.
To be eligible for participation in the WIOA Adult program an individual must be 18 years of age or older, a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen and registered with Selective Service (if applicable) to receive services under the adult program, with priority given to: recipients of public assistance, other low income individuals and individuals who are basic skills deficient. Career services (basic and individualized) under the adult program are available to adults who are employed or unemployed, and are unable to obtain employment or retain employment that leads to self-sufficiency. Training services may be made available to employed or unemployed adults who have met the eligibility criteria under training services, and have been determined to be unable to obtain or retain employment through career services.

SEMCA youth programs services 14-24 year olds in out-Wayne and Monroe Counties. Youth Program offices are currently located in the cities of Dearborn, Highland Park,, Livonia, Monroe, Southgate and Wayne. SEMCA’s Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Youth Program provides career exploration and guidance, continued support for educational attainment, opportunities for skills training in high-demand industries and occupations, and culminates with a good job along a career pathway or enrollment in post-secondary education.

SEMCA’s WIOA Youth Program Our WIOA Youth Program provides:

  • Career exploration activities, including Talent Tours to visit employers in high-demand industries and occupations
  • Labor market information and activities that help youth prepare for, and transition to, post-secondary education and training
  • Tutoring, study skills training, alternative secondary school offerings, dropout recovery services
  • Paid and unpaid work experiences, including internships, job shadowing, and summer employment opportunities
  • Occupational skills training
  • Leadership development opportunities
  • Supportive services, adult mentoring, follow-up services
  • Comprehensive guidance and counseling
  • Financial literacy education
  • Entrepreneurial skills training
  • Community service projects
  • And much more

 

Other youth programs: